Winter’s edge

 

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Warm days in full sun trapping us in joy. 

A picnic on a colorful blanket catching shadows from buds just reaching up through the long browned earth.

A stroll through our village watching shops waking from winter and cafés spilling over.

A bald eagle playing chase with a raven outside our window, so close their wings seemed to reach inside to us. 

Fingers pushing into dirt planting seeds that we now stalk for signs of that amazing first green.  

A bumblebee devouring nectar that caught our attention for while, and us sitting so still just enthralled to watch as it danced with a flower. 

How is it that these first moments of spring, these last of winter, both awaken and quiet us? 

Two butterflies seen. 

Growing light, lingering into night. 

These moments when winter starts to intermingle with spring; Cold, weeping days dotted with promises to come. 

Let us lay on this edge…..fall into the space between winter and spring. 

What a lovely few days it has been.

10 thoughts on “Winter’s edge

  1. Sabrina, Great bird feeder. The bird is so perfectly placed to complement the architecture of the bird feeder. My back yard is sort of a bird sanctuary. I have had about 7 different bird feeders all in it. But although I live in an upscale suburb on Chicago’s North Shore, I have a rat problem. It has nothing to do with cleanliness. The rats seek food because the more built up a community is, the rats and other rodents are being squeezed in their natural habitats and become scroungers. In my case, they come after the bird food spillage dropped on the ground. I have to take out a bush that has been there since before we moved into the home 42 years ago. It has beautiful red berries which drop to the ground at two different times during the season. And the rats love the berries. When I say rats, we are not talking about an inundation of them. But having a few in a built up suburb is ‘ichy’ enough. Boy do I sound like a city boy or what?

    However, all is not bad. A few years ago, my creative artistic side came to the fore, and I started to build my own unique designed bird houses and a couple of wooden abstract geometrical art pieces that are strategically placed in my garden area. My best one, a an octagon or an 8 sided polygon, fell off its pole and laying on the ground during the last throes of winter, badly deteriorated. I am in the process of reconstructing a copy of it.

    Building artistic and uniquely designed structures has come late in my life, but it is a side of me that was always there, but I never did much with it. I can’t draw a realistic picture for the life of me. But my creative mind tends toward geometric shapes, so all my creations tend to the geometric motifs.

    Actually the only time I expressed this tendency before, it was a blessing. When I was bored in grammar school, which was often, I would wile the time away crouching below the body of a kid sitting in front of me so I wouldn’t be seen. With pencil and a protractor, I would design and draw intricate forms on 8 1/2 X 11 standard size notebook paper with tiny square lines on it for use in math. They were painstakingly intricate enough that for each drawing, it would take up about a weeks worth of boring class time. Since it was done in pencil, I sprayed some preservative on them and put them in cheap frames. They are hanging in my study at home. After grammar school, I put this bent to sleep, but I recently rediscovered this yearning a few years ago. It has brought me much joy. When I paint my finished creations, I always use bright colors and my wife has a much better sense of color than I have, so I take her advice about the placement of colors in my creations.

    In the larger scheme of things, they are nowheres near museum quality, but when friends and relatives visit us, they take note, and some have told me I should make more and try to sell them.
    Bt that would defeat my effort’s purpose. I do it to release my creative energies and take joy in seeing them every day I am in my back yard. And of course, I love to receive compliments. What ‘arteest’ doesn’t like that, but I keep it to myself because it is not the thing to do in a genteel world. I also confess I hope that is something I can leave behind as part of my legacy. I write that with joy and not morbidness.

    My other endeavor that picked up since I retired in 2004, is I write and attend professional meetings to present my papers, publish some of them, speak to audiences sparingly about politics, and minimally keep my hand in the professional till, so to speak.

    For the last two years or so, I have studied Donald Trump and have become sort of an expert on him. While some friends and colleagues have tried to convince me to write a blog, I have steadfastly refused, because writing about sex, religion, and politics in an open forum online, invites to many crazies and fanatics to respond. I detest that. So, for the last 11 months, I write approximately one per month using my expertise long and sometimes short tomes, screeds, or essays analyzing Trump and send them to a select group of friends and former colleagues, as well as present some at professional meetings. It has been a challenge but lots of fun these past 11 months writing analysis on all things Trump. The fun part is one of my first papers is a psychiatric case study of him. That forms a base for understanding him because his psychoses and all behavior emanates one severe and rather rare mental disorder on the most severe and extreme end of the wide spectrum of narcissistic personality disorders. He also suffers from, to a lesser degree, of bipolar disorder.

    From really studying those disorders, which is absolutely necessary to begin to understand him, I have made many predictions about how he is going to behave and explain what he has already done. Keep in mind these are tendencies of behavior and not specific expressions or targets. I have counted these up, and so far I have around a 90% accuracy rate. Political scientists are not taught predictive or probabilistic ruminiations, but by using his severe mental disorders as a guide, being mostly right has not been too difficult for me.

    For instance, experts are split on the notion of whether Trump tells lies, or does he believe all his non-truths. I have written and have come down on the side that Trump never, ever tells a lie. He tells a multitude of non-truths and he believe they are reality. And this is a real distinction. This connects with his very insular ignorance of the world and of knowledge in general.

    Have fun reading this. Seymour

    1. You have rats, Seymour and we have ants! Only put this feeder out by default as our hummingbird one was being overrun with carpenter ants. And let me tell you, those ants crawled though vaseline, swam across my moats, swung from vines to get that sugar water. We finally gave up and put this one up and it’s bringing us such joy.

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